American Iron...

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I love military models...especially model tanks and old sailing ships.  Check out this cool model of the M-26 Pershing Tank...a heavy tank that was introduced in the very last months of World War Two.  Its too bad for the Allies that it didn't come sooner because it was the first tank that had the fire power and armor to take on the German Panthers and Tigers.  I didn't build this one yet but I'm going to start working on it this weekend.  Let's never forget that this Vehicle was named after a true Bad Ass...Black Jack Pershing...one of history's greatest Generals...

John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was the general in the United States Army who led the American Expeditionary Forces to victory over Germany in World War I, 1917–18. He rejected British and French demands that American forces be integrated with their armies, and insisted that the AEF would operate as a single unit under his command, although some American divisions fought under British command, and he also allowed all-black units to be integrated with the French army. US forces first saw serious battle at Cantigny, Chateau-Thierry, Belleau Wood, and Soissons. To speed up the arrival of the doughboys, they embarked for France leaving the heavy equipment behind, and used British and French tanks, artillery, airplanes and other munitions. In September 1918 at St. Mihiel, the First Army was directly under Pershing's command; it overwhelmed the salient which the German Army had held for three years. Pershing shifted 600,000 American soldiers to the heavily defended forests of the Argonne, keeping his divisions engaged in hard fighting for 47 days, alongside the French. The Allied Hundred Days Offensive, which the Argonne fighting was part of, resulted in the Germans to call for an armistice. Despite the end to the fighting, Pershing was of the opinion that the war should continue and that all of Germany should be occupied in an effort to permanently destroy German militarism.

Pershing is the only American to be promoted in his own lifetime to General of the Armies, the highest possible rank in the army; a law passed in 1976 retroactively promoted George Washington to the same rank but with higher seniority, ensuring that he would always be considered the senior ranking officer in the Army. Allowed to select his own insignia, Pershing chose to use four gold stars to distinguish himself from those officers who held the rank of General. After the creation of the five-star General of the Army rank during World War II, his rank of General of the Armies could unofficially be considered that of a six-star general, but he died before the proposed insignia could be considered and acted on by Congress.